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Texas Ebola Patient Prayed With Family on Phone

The patient who became the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States has been identified as a former chauffeur from Liberia who prayed with family members by phone today.

The patient, Thomas Eric Duncan, is being treated at an isolation unit at the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas.

Duncan, who is in his mid-30s, spoke on the phone today with family members who live near Charlotte, N.C.

“We talked today (with Duncan) and we prayed together with his mother and sister here,” said Joe Weeks, who lives with Duncan's sister Mai.

Weeks said that the family is concerned that Duncan was admitted to the hospital and put in isolation on Sunday, but hasn't received the experimental Ebola drugs.

“I don’t understand why he is not getting the Zmapp,” Weeks said.

The manufacturer of the drug has said they have run out of the experimental medicine.

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Face-to-Face With Patients in the Ebola Ward

Duncan's former boss in Monrovia, Liberia, said the patient had been his driver for the last year or two until he abruptly left his job in early September.

"I really don’t know," why he left, Henry Brunson, general manager of Safeway Cargo, told ABC News. "He didn’t resign. He just left the office. He just walked away.”

Brunson didn't know where Duncan went until he saw him on the news as the Ebola patient in Dallas, Texas.

Duncan's identity emerged as Texas health officials outlined efforts to track and monitor as many as 21 people Duncan had been in contact with since becoming sick over the weekend.

Texas Gov. Rick Perry said that among the people being monitored were five school-aged children who may have been exposed to Ebola by Duncan. The children, who attended school earlier this week, have been sent home, Perry said.

"Let me assure you, these children have been identified and are being monitored," the governor said.

"This is all hands on deck," Perry said.

The five students who were in contact with Duncan went to four different schools earlier in the week, but had no symptoms, officials said. Extra health workers and custodians will be on hand at those schools plus another nearby school that none of the children attended. The schools include three elementary schools, a middle school and a high school, officials said.

PHOTO: Thomas Eric Duncan, identified by a former employer and seen in this undated Facebook photo, is the first Ebola patient to be diagnosed in the United States.

Thomas Eric Duncan/Facebook

PHOTO: Thomas Eric Duncan, identified by a former employer and seen in this undated Facebook photo, is the first Ebola patient to be diagnosed in the United States.

"The students didn’t have any symptoms so the odds of them passing on any sort of virus is very low," said Dallas Independent School District Superintendent Mike Miles, adding that he learned of the students’ possible exposure Wednesday morning.

Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention, said today that it's "not impossible" that others will contract the disease despite an extensive tracking process is underway in the wake of the first Ebola diagnosis in the United States, with special focus on the patient’s family and health staff.

“We have a seven-person team in Dallas working with the local health department and the hospital, and we will be identifying everyone who may have come in contact with him and then monitoring them for 21 days,” Frieden said.

The city of Dallas, which has activated its Emergency Operations Center on "Level 2: High Readiness," said, "We are currently evaluating 12-18 people that the patient confirmed to have the Ebola virus was in contact with."

In addition, the three ambulance crew members that brought Duncan to the hospital were tested for Ebola. The tests were negative, but the crew members were sent home and will be monitored for the next three weeks, the city said in a statement.

Frieden believes the disease will be “stopped in its tracks” in this country.

Duncan's safety, along with the well-being of the medical people treating him, is a primary focus, Frieden said.

“What we need to do first in this particular instance is do everything possible to help this individual who’s really fighting for their life, and then make sure that we’re doing that, that we don’t have other people exposed in the hospital, identify all those contacts and monitor them for 21 days. It’s not impossible that one or two of them would develop symptoms and then they would need to be isolated,” he said.

Frieden said he’s confident that passengers who flew on the same plane as Duncan did not contract the disease.

“That was four or five days before he had his first symptoms and with Ebola, you’re not contagious until you have symptoms,” he said.

Although American Ebola patients have been treated in the United States prior to this diagnosis, they all contracted Ebola in West Africa. Ebola has killed 2,917 people and infected 3,346 others since the outbreak began in March.

Get real-time updates as this story unfolds. To start, just "star" this story in ABC News' phone app. Download ABC News for iPhone here or ABC News for Android here. To be notified about our live weekend digital reports, tap here.

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Texas Ebola Patient Identified

The patient who became the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, prompting a swift response from state and national public health authorities, has been identified as Thomas Eric Duncan, a source with knowledge of the government response told ABC News.

The diagnosis of a patient with Ebola in Texas was announced Tuesday by federal officials, but they declined to release any information about the patient.

Duncan's identity was confirmed today by a source familiar with the government's response to the diagnosis. He name emerged as Texas health officials outlined efforts to track and monitor as many as 21 people Duncan had been in contact with since becoming sick over the weekend.

Texas Gov. Rick Perry said that among the people being monitored were five school-aged children who may have been exposed to Ebola by Duncan. The children, who attended school earlier this week, has been sent home, Perry said.

"Let me assure you, these children have been identified and are being monitored," the governor said.

"This is all hands on deck," Perry said.

First Ebola Case in U.S., But CDC Vows 'We Will Stop It Here'

What You Need to Know About the Ebola Virus

Face-to-Face With Patients in the Ebola Ward

The five students who were in contact with Duncan went to four different schools earlier in the week, but had no symptoms, officials said. Extra health workers and custodians will be on hand at those schools plus another nearby school that none of the children attended. The schools include three elementary schools, a middle school and a high school, officials said.

"The students didn’t have any symptoms so the odds of them passing on any sort of virus is very low," said Dallas Independent School District Superintendent Mike Miles, adding that he learned of the students’ possible exposure Wednesday morning.

Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention, said today that it's "not impossible" that others will contract the disease despite an extensive tracking process is underway in the wake of the first Ebola diagnosis in the United States, with special focus on the patient’s family and health staff.

“We have a seven-person team in Dallas working with the local health department and the hospital, and we will be identifying everyone who may have come in contact with him and then monitoring them for 21 days,” Frieden said.

The city of Dallas, which has activated its Emergency Operations Center on "Level 2: High Readiness," said, "We are currently evaluating 12-18 people that the patient confirmed to have the Ebola virus was in contact with."

In addition, the three ambulance crew members that brought Duncan to the hospital were tested for Ebola. The tests were negative, but the crew members were sent home and will be monitored for the next three weeks, the city said in a statement.

Frieden believes the disease will be “stopped in its tracks” in this country.

Duncan's safety, along with the well-being of the medical people treating him, is a primary focus, Frieden said.

“What we need to do first in this particular instance is do everything possible to help this individual who’s really fighting for their life, and then make sure that we’re doing that, that we don’t have other people exposed in the hospital, identify all those contacts and monitor them for 21 days. It’s not impossible that one or two of them would develop symptoms and then they would need to be isolated,” he said.

Frieden said he’s confident that passengers who flew on the same plane as Duncan did not contract the disease.

“That was four or five days before he had his first symptoms and with Ebola, you’re not contagious until you have symptoms,” he said.

Although American Ebola patients have been treated in the United States prior to this diagnosis, they all contracted Ebola in West Africa. Ebola has killed 2,917 people and infected 3,346 others since the outbreak began in March.

Get real-time updates as this story unfolds. To start, just "star" this story in ABC News' phone app. Download ABC News for iPhone here or ABC News for Android here. To be notified about our live weekend digital reports, tap here.

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More: DirecTV agreement with NFL on Sunday Ticket keeps AT&T deal intact – @businessinsider

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School Age Children Exposed to Ebola Patient

School-aged children in Texas may have been exposed to Ebola by the first patient diagnosed with the virus in the United States, officials said today.

The children had contact with the patient and are being monitored at home, Texas Gov. Rick Perry said today in a press conference.

"Let me assure you, these children have been identified and are being monitored," the governor said.

"This is all hands on deck," Perry said.

The country's top medical official who has vowed to stop Ebola "in its tracks" in the U.S., conceded today that it's "not impossible" that others will contract the disease.

Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said an extensive tracking process is underway in the wake of the first Ebola diagnosis in the United States, with special focus on the patient’s family and health staff.

“We have a seven-person team in Dallas working with the local health department and the hospital, and we will be identifying everyone who may have come in contact with him and then monitoring them for 21 days,” Frieden said.

First Ebola Case in U.S., But CDC Vows 'We Will Stop It Here'

What You Need to Know About the Ebola Virus

Face-to-Face With Patients in the Ebola Ward

The city of Dallas, which has activated its Emergency Operations Center on "Level 2: High Readiness," said, "We are currently evaluating 12-18 people that the patient confirmed to have the Ebola virus was in contact with."

In addition, the three ambulance crew members that brought the patient to the hospital were tested for Ebola. The tests were negative, but the crew members were sent home and will be monitored for the next three weeks, the city said in a statement.

Frieden believes the disease will be “stopped in its tracks” in this country.

The unidentified man’s safety, along with the well-being of the medical people treating him, is a primary focus, Frieden said.

“What we need to do first in this particular instance is do everything possible to help this individual who’s really fighting for their life, and then make sure that we’re doing that, that we don’t have other people exposed in the hospital, identify all those contacts and monitor them for 21 days. It’s not impossible that one or two of them would develop symptoms and then they would need to be isolated,” he said.

Frieden said he’s confident that passengers who flew on the same plane as the patient did not contract the disease.

“That was four or five days before he had his first symptoms and with Ebola, you’re not contagious until you have symptoms,” he said.

Although American Ebola patients have been treated in the United States prior to this diagnosis, they all contracted Ebola in West Africa. Ebola has killed 2,917 people and infected 3,346 others since the outbreak began in March.

Get real-time updates as this story unfolds. To start, just "star" this story in ABC News' phone app. Download ABC News for iPhone here or ABC News for Android here. To be notified about our live weekend digital reports, tap here.

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Why the CDC Won’t Release the Ebola Patient’s Flight Itinerary

The flight information for the Ebola patient diagnosed in Texas will not be released by health officials because "It's just not necessary," a spokesperson at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told ABC News.

The CDC announced that the man has tested positive for the disease, making him the first person to have discovered he had the virus while on U.S. soil, and they made it clear that he traveled from Liberia to America to visit family in Dallas.

"If we need to contact passengers we have a way. We'd call ourselves," the CDC spokesperson said.

Even though the CDC will not release his flight plan from Liberia to the United States, it is clear that he would have had to make at least two transfers -- including one in at least one other country.

Flights from the airport in the Liberian capital of Monrovia fly to only six destinations -- four in West and Central Africa, one flight to Morocco and one flight to Brussels, Belgium. There are no direct flights into the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport from any of those six destinations, meaning that man had to make at least one more change.

The CDC said Tuesday that the passengers who unknowingly traveled with the man need not be concerned because he was not contagious while he was on the plane.

"The ill person did not exhibit symptoms of Ebola during the flights from West Africa and CDC does not recommend that people on the same commercial airline flights undergo monitoring, as Ebola is only contagious if the person is experiencing active symptoms," the agency said in a statement Tuesday.

The man left Liberia on Sept. 19 and arrived in Texas on Sept. 20, CDC Director Tom Frieden said.

"Ebola doesn't spread before someone gets sick and he didn't get sick until four days after he got off the airplane," Frieden noted during a news conference Tuesday.

On his first visit to the hospital, doctors did not immediately conclude that he had Ebola and they sent him home but he returned with much more drastic symptoms on Sept. 27, according to the CDC. He was put in a special isolation unit the following day.

Part of the problem in diagnosing Ebola comes from the fact that patients, like this man, can take up to 21 days to exhibit symptoms such as fever, muscle pain, vomiting and bleeding.

Get real-time updates as this story unfolds. To start, just "star" this story in ABC News' phone app. Download ABC News for iPhone here or ABC News for Android here. To be notified about our live weekend digital reports, tap here.

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October tech stocks: A treat for investors?

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Will tech earnings in October be a trick or treat?

This month, several tech giants, including Apple (AAPL), Google (GOOG) and Microsoft (MSFT), are expected to reveal quarterly earnings, part of an October earnings bonanza.

Nasdaq tech analyst Mike Stiller predicts numbers for tech heavyweights will be solid, but investors will be focusing more closely on future outlooks instead of the present.

"It's more looking at the commentary and forward-looking numbers than the current quarters," says Stiller.

The headliner will likely be Apple, expected to announce fourth-quarter earnings later in the month. Apple should provide more clarity on sales of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus smartphones, which launched Sept. 19.

Apple says iPhone sales topped 10 million during opening weekend. Based on pre-order estimates, the iPhone 6 Plus has been particularly popular, with wait times on online orders stretching as far as November.

But Apple might not be done with the product announcements in 2014. Several reports suggest Apple will unveil a new iPad Air and iPad Mini tablet during an event in October. The time frame falls in line with iPad announcements last year and in 2012, both of which took place this month.

The arrival of new iPads comes as signs of weaker demand for tablets are starting to show. In August, research firm IDC lowered its tablet forecast for 2014, anticipating year-over-year growth of 6.5%, down from the 12% that was previously predicted.

Apple is also looking to reverse a slump in iPad sales. During the third quarter, Apple sold 13.2 million iPads, down 9% compared with last year.

S&P Capital IQ analyst Scott Kessler says several factors contribute to the dip in iPad sales, including a slower upgrade cycle. "Most people upgrade their phone every one to two years," he says. "Most people look to upgrade their iPads more consistently with when they upgrade their computers."

Other big tech names expected to report this month:

Google. The tech giant recently jumped into the smartwatch market, as the first wave of Android Wear devices hit the market. Companies including Motorola and LG built smartwatches that will support Android Wear, and it's likely Google provides details on how well they're selling during its third-quarter report.

Microsoft. The company's first-quarter earnings call will be the first since it announced its acquisition of Minecraft maker Mojang for $2.5 billion. The deal shores up Microsoft's stance in support of the Xbox brand, and could give a jolt to its Windows Phone devices. Meanwhile, investors could learn more details on Windows 9, the latest edition of its longstanding PC operating system.

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Pebble drops price of smartwatch to $99

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The company that helped launch the smartwatch trend is unveiling a price drop and the addition of a key new feature.

Pebble announced Tuesday it is cutting the price of its smartwatch from $150 to $99, while the fancier Pebble Steel will dip to $199.

The price cut is part of a larger push to draw more customers to the Pebble smartwatch, as competitors including Apple and Google enter the fray. The company is expanding availability to new retailers in the U.S. and Europe, including Sam's Club and Sprint stores.

Pebble will also include support for full activity tracking in the background. "This is something people have been hammering us for for a while," said Pebble CEO Eric Migicovsky. "We wanted to take the time to do it right."

Wearable maker Misfit will create an app for Pebble that tracks activity and sleep patterns, while Jawbone will launch an Up app that serves as an activity-tracking watchface. Pebble will also include an app from Swim.com, where users can track swimming data like strokes and distance, then sync results to their smartphone once they're out of the pool.

"It doesn't revolutionize your life," says Migicovsky of his company's smartwatch. "It's meant to be something that you can slap on your wrist and make things better one little bit at a time."

Migicovsky didn't share specific numbers, but says Pebble sales are up. More importantly, according to Migicovsky, engagement with Pebble is rising. He cites a survey noting 75% of Pebble owners wear their watch more than 20 out of 30 days per month.

"We're looking to make a watch that people can use on a regular basis that adds a little bit of value here and there, and over time becomes part of what they put on in the morning," he says.

A lot has changed in the smartwatch market this year. Google jumped into the space with its line of Android Wear devices. Samsung continues to expand its Galaxy Gear line. Then there's Apple, which revealed the Apple Watch during an event earlier this month. The device starts at $349, and will launch next year.

Migicovsky says it's "wonderful" to see several new entrants in the smartwatch market, but says they're not aiming to compete with Apple Watch.

"We set out to make an affordable and accessible product," he says. "Apple has definitely taken a lot of what makes Pebble great, but they've created much more of a luxury product."

Pebble has continued expanding features as more companies venture into smartwatches. Earlier this year, Pebble launched an official app store, which boasts 4,000 apps that have been downloaded 5 million times. It has attracted big partners including Foursquare, ESPN and The Weather Channel, which recently launched a watchface that provides local weather forecasts.

"We want to make sure we build a product people can actually buy and use on a regular basis," says Migicovsky. "We're trying to build a platform."

Follow Brett Molina on Twitter: @brettmolina23.

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Hong Kong Leader Rejects Protesters’ Demands

Associated Press

Pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong set a Wednesday deadline for a response from the government to meet their demands for reforms after spending another night blocking streets in an unprecedented show of civil disobedience.

A brief statement from the Occupy Central civil disobedience movement said it had set an Oct. 1 deadline for the city's unpopular chief executive, Leung Chun-ying, to meet their demands for genuine democracy and for him to step down as Hong Kong's leader.

The group said on Twitter it would "announce new civil disobedience plans same day," without elaborating.

Even larger crowds are expected to flood the streets Wednesday, China's National Day holiday. The government said it was canceling a fireworks display to mark the day.

Leung on Tuesday urged Occupy Central to take into account the considerations of other residents and stop its protest, which has snarled traffic and disrupted public transport for days. But he said China's communist leaders in Beijing would not back down from an August decision to restrict voting reforms for the first direct elections to pick his successor in 2017.

"The central government will not rescind its decision," he said.

One day after police shocked the city by firing tear gas at the crowds, the protesters passed a peaceful night Monday singing as the blocked streets in several parts of Hong Kong. They also staged a brief "mobile light" vigil, waving their glowing cell phones as the protests stretched into their fourth day. Crowds chanted calls for Leung to resign, and sang anthems calling for freedom.

Police arrested a man who drove his Mercedes-Benz through a crowd of protesters occupying a street in the densely populated Kowloon neighborhood of Mong Kok. Local television footage showed people scrambling as the car sped through the crowd while honking just before 2 a.m. No one was injured.

By Tuesday morning, the crowd, mostly students, continued to occupy a six-lane highway next to the local government headquarters. The encampment was also edging closer to the heart of the city's financial district.

Police said they used 87 rounds of tear gas Sunday in what they called a necessary but restrained response to protesters pushing through cordons and barricades. They said 41 people were injured, including 12 police officers.

"Police cordon lines were heavily charged by some violent protesters. So police had to use the minimum force in order to separate the distance at that moment between the protesters and also the police," said Cheung Tak-keung, the assistant police commissioner for operations.

The atmosphere was more festive Monday as constantly shifting crowds blocked major roads. People moved in and out of the sit-ins, some bringing in food and drink while others fetched their own. Some high school students, still in their school uniforms, sat on the pavement doing their homework.

"It's already the fourth day, so it's really tiring," said Ching-ching Tse, a 24-year-old student at the Chinese University of Hong Kong who was on her second day of collecting trash in the protest area with her friends. "So we are forming some groups and hope we can do some shifts and take turns."

Officials announced that schools in some districts of Hong Kong would remain closed Tuesday because of safety concerns, while dozens of bus routes were canceled and some subway stops near protest areas were closed.

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Secret Service Director: White House Intrusion ‘Unacceptable’

Facing an outraged Congressional committee today, Secret Service Director Julia Pierson called the White House intrusion that took place on Sept. 19 as “unacceptable.”

“Protecting the White House complex is a challenge in any environment,” she said. “We are never satisfied by the status quo and we are constantly reviewing our security protocols.”

In a startling security lapse, 42-year-old Omar Gonzalez, armed with a 3 1/2-inch serrated knife, scaled the north fence at the White House, stormed through the unlocked North Portico door and barrelled past an agent into the East Room just minutes after the First Family had departed the White House,

7 Questions for Secret Service Director Julia Pierson After White House Intrusion

White House Fence Jumper Got Farther Than Previously Thought

11 Worst White House Security Breaches of All Time

House Oversight and Government Reform Chairman Darrell Issa called lawmakers back to Capitol Hill to convene the rare recess hearing, saying the failure “has tested the trust of the American people in the Secret Service” to protect the president.

“Common sense tells us that there were a series of security failures, not an instance of praiseworthy restraint. Inexplicably, Omar Gonzalez breached at least five rings of security on September 19th,” Issa, R-Calif., said. “The White House is supposed to be one of America’s most secure facilities, and in fact, one of the world’s most secure facilities. So how on earth did it happen?”

Pierson -- brought in just 18 months ago to clean up the scandal-plagued agency -- now faces a scandal of her own.

She said 16 people have been apprehended scaling the fence over the past five years, including six just this year.

“Our goal today is also clear: to determine how this happened and make sure it does not happen again,” said Democrat Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md. “I hate to even imagine what could have happened if Gonzalez had been carrying a gun instead of a knife when he burst inside the White House. That possibility is extremely unsettling.”

A “crash box” alarm that should have alerted agents of an intruder had been muted at the behest of the chief usher’s office, the Washington Post reported Monday, and the agent guarding the door had no time to lock it before Gonzalez entered.

While the incident is sure to be the primary focus of the hearing, lawmakers also demanded answers about an incident the next day when an unauthorized vehicle was cleared into the White House compound, as well as a 2011 incident when a man fired several rounds at the White House while some of the president’s family was inside.

Pierson reportedly requested that much of the hearing take place behind closed doors, calling a public discussion of Secret Service practices “beyond reckless.” Lawmakers claimed the public deserves to know what happened, but agreed to hold a classified session immediately following today’s open hearing.

Get real-time updates as this story unfolds. To start, just "star" this story in ABC News' phone app. Download ABC News for iPhone here or ABC News for Android here. To be notified about our live weekend digital reports, tap here.

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Creator of spying app arrested

StealthGenie claimed users could monitor phone calls, texts and emails of other phones once installed.
StealthGenie claimed users could monitor phone calls, texts and emails of other phones once installed.
  • A Pakistani man, Hammad Akbar, is arrested in case of spying app
  • StealthGenie was marketed as tool for monitoring spouses and children
  • FBI: It's first time anyone has faced criminal charges for marketing, selling such an app

(CNN) -- The creator of StealthGenie, a mobile app marketed as a tool for spying on cheating spouses and keeping tabs on children, has been arrested, according to federal authorities.

The FBI said the case marks the first time anyone has faced criminal charges for marketing and selling such an app.

StealthGenie could monitor calls, texts, videos and other communications on mobile phones without detection. It's among a handful of mobile applications called "stalker apps."

"Selling spyware is not just reprehensible, it's a crime," said Assistant U.S. Attorney General Leslie R. Caldwell. "Apps like StealthGenie are expressly designed for use by stalkers and domestic abusers who want to know every detail of a victim's personal life -- all without the victim's knowledge."

The app's website appeared to have been taken down Tuesday morning.

Stalker: A creepy look at you online

Hammad Akbar, 31, of Lahore, Pakistan, was arrested Saturday in Los Angeles and appeared in court Monday. He faces charges of conspiracy, sale of a surreptitious interception device, advertisement of a known interception device and advertising a device as a surreptitious interception device.

Authorities indicted him in Virginia, where a data center that hosted StealthGenie is located, an FBI statement said.

According to the indictment, users of the app had to access a person's phone for just a few minutes to install the app.

"As technology continues to evolve, the FBI will investigate and bring to justice those who use illegal means to monitor and track individuals without their knowledge," said Andrew McCabe, assistant director in charge of the FBI's Washington Field Office, in the statement.

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