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Hong Kong Leader Rejects Protesters’ Demands

Associated Press

Pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong set a Wednesday deadline for a response from the government to meet their demands for reforms after spending another night blocking streets in an unprecedented show of civil disobedience.

A brief statement from the Occupy Central civil disobedience movement said it had set an Oct. 1 deadline for the city's unpopular chief executive, Leung Chun-ying, to meet their demands for genuine democracy and for him to step down as Hong Kong's leader.

The group said on Twitter it would "announce new civil disobedience plans same day," without elaborating.

Even larger crowds are expected to flood the streets Wednesday, China's National Day holiday. The government said it was canceling a fireworks display to mark the day.

Leung on Tuesday urged Occupy Central to take into account the considerations of other residents and stop its protest, which has snarled traffic and disrupted public transport for days. But he said China's communist leaders in Beijing would not back down from an August decision to restrict voting reforms for the first direct elections to pick his successor in 2017.

"The central government will not rescind its decision," he said.

One day after police shocked the city by firing tear gas at the crowds, the protesters passed a peaceful night Monday singing as the blocked streets in several parts of Hong Kong. They also staged a brief "mobile light" vigil, waving their glowing cell phones as the protests stretched into their fourth day. Crowds chanted calls for Leung to resign, and sang anthems calling for freedom.

Police arrested a man who drove his Mercedes-Benz through a crowd of protesters occupying a street in the densely populated Kowloon neighborhood of Mong Kok. Local television footage showed people scrambling as the car sped through the crowd while honking just before 2 a.m. No one was injured.

By Tuesday morning, the crowd, mostly students, continued to occupy a six-lane highway next to the local government headquarters. The encampment was also edging closer to the heart of the city's financial district.

Police said they used 87 rounds of tear gas Sunday in what they called a necessary but restrained response to protesters pushing through cordons and barricades. They said 41 people were injured, including 12 police officers.

"Police cordon lines were heavily charged by some violent protesters. So police had to use the minimum force in order to separate the distance at that moment between the protesters and also the police," said Cheung Tak-keung, the assistant police commissioner for operations.

The atmosphere was more festive Monday as constantly shifting crowds blocked major roads. People moved in and out of the sit-ins, some bringing in food and drink while others fetched their own. Some high school students, still in their school uniforms, sat on the pavement doing their homework.

"It's already the fourth day, so it's really tiring," said Ching-ching Tse, a 24-year-old student at the Chinese University of Hong Kong who was on her second day of collecting trash in the protest area with her friends. "So we are forming some groups and hope we can do some shifts and take turns."

Officials announced that schools in some districts of Hong Kong would remain closed Tuesday because of safety concerns, while dozens of bus routes were canceled and some subway stops near protest areas were closed.

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Secret Service Director: White House Intrusion ‘Unacceptable’

Facing an outraged Congressional committee today, Secret Service Director Julia Pierson called the White House intrusion that took place on Sept. 19 as “unacceptable.”

“Protecting the White House complex is a challenge in any environment,” she said. “We are never satisfied by the status quo and we are constantly reviewing our security protocols.”

In a startling security lapse, 42-year-old Omar Gonzalez, armed with a 3 1/2-inch serrated knife, scaled the north fence at the White House, stormed through the unlocked North Portico door and barrelled past an agent into the East Room just minutes after the First Family had departed the White House,

7 Questions for Secret Service Director Julia Pierson After White House Intrusion

White House Fence Jumper Got Farther Than Previously Thought

11 Worst White House Security Breaches of All Time

House Oversight and Government Reform Chairman Darrell Issa called lawmakers back to Capitol Hill to convene the rare recess hearing, saying the failure “has tested the trust of the American people in the Secret Service” to protect the president.

“Common sense tells us that there were a series of security failures, not an instance of praiseworthy restraint. Inexplicably, Omar Gonzalez breached at least five rings of security on September 19th,” Issa, R-Calif., said. “The White House is supposed to be one of America’s most secure facilities, and in fact, one of the world’s most secure facilities. So how on earth did it happen?”

Pierson -- brought in just 18 months ago to clean up the scandal-plagued agency -- now faces a scandal of her own.

She said 16 people have been apprehended scaling the fence over the past five years, including six just this year.

“Our goal today is also clear: to determine how this happened and make sure it does not happen again,” said Democrat Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md. “I hate to even imagine what could have happened if Gonzalez had been carrying a gun instead of a knife when he burst inside the White House. That possibility is extremely unsettling.”

A “crash box” alarm that should have alerted agents of an intruder had been muted at the behest of the chief usher’s office, the Washington Post reported Monday, and the agent guarding the door had no time to lock it before Gonzalez entered.

While the incident is sure to be the primary focus of the hearing, lawmakers also demanded answers about an incident the next day when an unauthorized vehicle was cleared into the White House compound, as well as a 2011 incident when a man fired several rounds at the White House while some of the president’s family was inside.

Pierson reportedly requested that much of the hearing take place behind closed doors, calling a public discussion of Secret Service practices “beyond reckless.” Lawmakers claimed the public deserves to know what happened, but agreed to hold a classified session immediately following today’s open hearing.

Get real-time updates as this story unfolds. To start, just "star" this story in ABC News' phone app. Download ABC News for iPhone here or ABC News for Android here. To be notified about our live weekend digital reports, tap here.

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Basis unveils new Peak fitness tracker

Basis unveils a new fitness watch called Peak that measures activity, has a 4-day battery life and is water resistant.

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SAN FRANCISCO – Intel-owned fitness-band maker Basis is shifting into higher gear with a new device called Peak — which it says improves on its built-in heart rate monitoring and, coming soon, will add basic smartwatch functionality.

The Basis Peak arrives in November for $199. It's a big update for Basis, which was acquired by Intel in March for an undisclosed price rumored to be in the $100-$150 million range.

In a crowded category, Basis has made its mark by going deeper with sensor technology. The new Peak tracks your heart rate whenever you're wearing it, without a chest strap, and also monitors other physiological data like perspiration and skin temperature. It also covers the basics: steps and other activity tracking, and sleep tracking and the like in an automated way. It can tell when you are walking, running, biking or sleeping without you having to adjust settings.

The new Peak band is a smart-looking monochrome touchscreen device that looks very much like a watch. Among key features are improved heart rate sensors on the back, battery life of up to four days and water resistance for swimming. It has a forged aluminum body and Gorilla Glass screen.

The new sensors on the Basis Peak.(Photo: Basis)

It works with apps for Apple and Android devices.

I got a first look at Peak in a demo at USA TODAY's San Francisco bureau. Out of the gate, Peak looks and feels great. A future upgrade will add some smartphone notifications for incoming calls and texts. That could be key as fitness bands feel the heat from smartwatches hitting the market from tech heavyweights including Samsung, LG, Motorola, Sony and soon Apple.

In a recent report, research firm Canalys said shipments of "wearable" bands will grow to 43.2 million units in 2015, up 129% from this year. It divides the category into two segments – smart bands, which can run third-party applications, and basic bands, which don't.

Basic bands from Jawbone, Fitbit and others have a lower-price advantage for now, Canalys principal analyst Chris Jones said in the report. Eventually, though, intensifying competition will drive prices down even further, threatening basic bands.

Basis is part of Intel's New Devices Group, run by Apple vet Michael Bell.

Once Peak launches, previous Basis bands will be supported but won't be available for purchase. As of Monday, the original Basis was available on the company's website for $149.

The new Peak can be pre-ordered at mybasis.com (existing customers), Amazon and Best Buy.

Follow Nancy Blair on Twitter: @nansanfran.

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Protesters Fill Hong Kong Streets as Deadline Looms

Pro-democracy protesters filled the streets of Hong Kong Tuesday, one day ahead of a deadline for governmental reform.

The Occupy Central movement says it set an Oct. 1 deadline for the city’s unpopular Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying to meet their demands for genuine democracy and for him to step down as leader of Hong Kong. The deadline was established in recent days, a means to elicit a government response.

Oct. 1 marks the 65th anniversary of the establishment of the People’s Republic of China.

PHOTO: A student protester rests next to a defaced cut-out of Hong Kongs Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying at one of their protest sites around the government headquarters, Sept. 30, 2014, in Hong Kong.

Wong Maye-E/AP Photo

PHOTO: A student protester rests next to a defaced cut-out of Hong Kong's Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying at one of their protest sites around the government headquarters, Sept. 30, 2014, in Hong Kong.

Occupy Central – a campaign advocating a free, independent voting process – accused the government of employing delay tactics, “clearly a disregard for public opinion,” according to a statement posted on the group’s website.

Activists, many of them students, have been camped out since late Friday, demanding that Beijing grant democratic reforms to the former British colony.

The activists have been dubbed the “umbrella revolution” by some, because the crowds have used umbrellas to not only block the sun, but also to stop the police from hitting them with pepper spray.

PHOTO: Student activists sleep on a road near the government headquarters where pro-democracy activists have gathered and made camp, Sept. 30, 2014, in Hong Kong.

Wong Maye-E/AP Photo

PHOTO: Student activists sleep on a road near the government headquarters where pro-democracy activists have gathered and made camp, Sept. 30, 2014, in Hong Kong.

Monday marked a relatively peaceful night. A group of musicians entertained crowds with a rendition of “Do You Hear the People Sing” from the musical Les Miserables.

The activists also staged a “mobile light” vigil, waving their glowing cell phones as the protests stretched into the fourth day.

Activists remained in the streets Tuesday, some catching naps wherever they could find them.

PHOTO: A pro-democracy activist sleeps on the sidewalk after an overnight protest, Sept. 30, 2014, in Hong Kong.

Wong Maye-E/AP Photo

PHOTO: A pro-democracy activist sleeps on the sidewalk after an overnight protest, Sept. 30, 2014, in Hong Kong.

Vivian Lo and Ka Sing Fung, 30, posed for photographs in front of the protest site after marrying.

PHOTO: Newly married couple Vivian Lo and Ka Sing Fung, both 30 years old from Hong Kong, pose for their personal photographer, in front of the protest site of pro-democracy activists, Sept. 30, 2014, in Hong Kong.

Wong Maye-E/AP Photo

PHOTO: Newly married couple Vivian Lo and Ka Sing Fung, both 30 years old from Hong Kong, pose for their personal photographer, in front of the protest site of pro-democracy activists, Sept. 30, 2014, in Hong Kong.

China's National Day should bring even larger crowds flooding the streets Wednesday. The government said it was canceling a fireworks display planned to celebrate the National Day, a decision criticized by Occupy Central.

“The government's decision to cancel the firework display on the national day and postpone the consultation on constitutional reform is just aiming to avoid further deterioration in governance and intensification of social conflicts,” the group wrote online.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Body of Arkansas Real Estate Agent Found

Authorities found the body of Arkansas real estate agent Beverly Carter overnight, days after she vanished while showing a house to a prospective customer.

Carter's body was found in Cabot, Pulaski County Sheriff's Office Lt. Carl Minden told ABC News. The Little Rock suburb is located about 25 miles north from the house she was showing in Scott.

Aaron Michael Lewis, 33, has been apprehended and admitted to the kidnapping after being questioned by police, Minden said. Lewis did not admit to murder and did not provide any details about Carter's whereabouts, Minden said.

Lewis is scheduled to appear in court this morning and faces a charge of capital murder, Minden said.

PHOTO: Pictured is suspect Aaron Lewis.

Pulaski County Sheriffs Office

PHOTO: Pictured is suspect Aaron Lewis.

Carter vanished Thursday after showing the home in Scott, a small community located in the central part of the state.

Lewis was involved in a car accident Sunday – but since authorities didn’t have a warrant to arrest him, he slipped away after being treated at a Little Rock hospital.

PHOTO: Beverly Carter, right, is pictured in this undated handout photo.

Pulaski County Sheriffs Office

PHOTO: Beverly Carter, right, is pictured in this undated handout photo.

Following Carter’s disappearance, police and hundreds of her friends scoured the woods, searching for any sign of her.

Carter, 50, is survived by her husband of more than 30 years, Carl, as well as two grown sons and four grandchildren, with another grandchild on the way.

Get real-time updates as this story unfolds. To start, just "star" this story in ABC News' phone app. Download ABC News for iPhone here or ABC News for Android here.

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Hong Kong leader digs in, tells protesters to go home ‘immediately’

Hong Kong's chief executive urged pro-democracy protesters to stop their campaign "immediately" Tuesday after demonstrators gave the Chinese government a Wednesday deadline to meet their demands for political reforms. 

Leung Chun-ying said that Beijing would not reverse its earlier decision to hand-pick eligible candidates to lead the former British colony, which only became part of China in 1997. 

"I don’t believe that the continued use of illegal activities will compel the Chinese government to reverse the…ruling by the National People’s Congress Standing Committee," said Leung, who also rejected calls from the protesters to step down, saying "Any personnel change before the implementation of universal suffrage is achieved would only allow Hong Kong to continue to pick its leader under the Election Committee model."

Earlier Tuesday, the pro-democracy Occupy Central announced the October 1 deadline for reforms to be implemented, including Leung's resignation. The group added that it would "announce new civil disobedience plans same day."

Leung addressed the group directly in his media briefing Tuesday, saying "Occupy Central founders had said repeatedly that if the movement is getting out of control, they would call for it to stop. I'm now asking them to fulfil the promise they made to society, and stop this campaign immediately."

Wednesday is is a holiday for China's National Day, and even larger crowds are expected to flood the streets. The government said it was canceling a fireworks display planned to celebrate the National Day, which marks the 1949 founding of the People's Republic of China. 

China's decision last month to allow a committee of mostly pro-Beijing tycoons to select the candidates is viewed by many residents as reneging on promises to allow greater democracy in the semi-autonomous territory, since Beijing had promised that the chief executive would eventually be chosen through "universal suffrage."

One day after police shocked the city by firing tear gas at the crowds, the protesters passed a peaceful night Monday singing as the blocked streets in several parts of Hong Kong. They also staged a brief "mobile light" vigil, waving their glowing cell phones as the protests stretched into their fourth day. Crowds chanted calls for Leung to resign, and sang anthems calling for freedom.

Police arrested a man who drove his Mercedes-Benz through a crowd of protesters occupying a street in the densely populated Kowloon neighborhood of Mong Kok. Local television footage showed people scrambling as the car sped through the crowd while honking just before 2 a.m. No one was injured.

;By Tuesday morning, the crowd, mostly students, continued to occupy a six-lane highway next to the local government headquarters. The encampment was also edging closer to the heart of the city's financial district.

Police said they used 87 rounds of tear gas Sunday in what they called a necessary but restrained response to protesters pushing through cordons and barricades. They said 41 people were injured, including 12 police officers.

"Police cordon lines were heavily charged by some violent protesters. So police had to use the minimum force in order to separate the distance at that moment between the protesters and also the police," said Cheung Tak-keung, the assistant police commissioner for operations.

The atmosphere was more festive Monday as constantly shifting crowds blocked major roads. People moved in and out of the sit-ins, some bringing in food and drink while others fetched their own. Some high school students, still in their school uniforms, sat on the pavement doing their homework.

"It's already the fourth day, so it's really tiring," said Ching-ching Tse, a 24-year-old student at the Chinese University of Hong Kong who was on her second day of collecting trash in the protest area with her friends. "So we are forming some groups and hope we can do some shifts and take turns."

Officials announced that schools in some districts of Hong Kong would remain closed Tuesday because of safety concerns, while dozens of bus routes were canceled and some subway stops near protest areas were closed.

The protests have been dubbed the "Umbrella Revolution" by some, because the crowds have used umbrellas to not only block the sun, but also to stop the police from hitting them with pepper spray. Political slogans calling for freedom have also been written on the umbrellas.

Many younger Hong Kong residents raised in an era of plenty and with no experience of past political turmoil in mainland China have higher expectations. Under an agreement set in 1984, before most of them were born, Beijing promised to allow Hong Kong residents civil liberties -- unseen in the rest of China -- after it took control of the city.

China's communist leaders take a hard line against any threat to their monopoly on power, including clamping down on dissidents and Muslim Uighur separatists in the country's far west, but it cannot crack down too harshly on the semi-autonomous territory where a freewheeling media ensures global visibility.

Across the border, Chinese state media have provided scant coverage of the protests beyond noting that an illegal gathering spun out of control and was being curtailed by police.

The protests began a week ago with a class boycott by university and college students demanding reforms of the local legislature and a withdrawal of Beijing's requirement that election candidates be screened. Leaders of the broader Occupy Central civil disobedience movement joined the protesters early Sunday, saying they wanted to kick-start a long-threatened mass sit-in demanding Hong Kong's top leader be elected without Beijing's interference.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

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Hong Kong Protesters Set Deadline for Government

Associated Press

Pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong set a Wednesday deadline for a response from the government to meet their demands for reforms after spending another night blocking streets in an unprecedented show of civil disobedience.

A brief statement from the Occupy Central civil disobedience movement said it had set an Oct. 1 deadline for the city's unpopular Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying to meet their demands for genuine democracy and for him to step down as leader of Hong Kong.

It said they would "announce new civil disobedience plans same day."

Wednesday is a holiday for China's National Day, and even larger crowds are expected to flood the streets. The government said it was canceling a fireworks display planned to celebrate the National Day.

One day after police shocked the city by firing tear gas at the crowds, the protesters passed a peaceful night Monday singing as the blocked streets in several parts of Hong Kong. They also staged a brief "mobile light" vigil, waving their glowing cell phones as the protests stretched into their fourth day. Crowds chanted calls for Leung to resign, and sang anthems calling for freedom.

"The students are protecting the right to vote, for Hong Kong's future. We are not scared, we are not frightened, we just fight for it," said Carol Chan, a 55-year-old civil service worker who took two days off to join the protests after becoming angered over police use of tear gas Sunday.

Students and activists have been camped out since late Friday, demanding that Beijing grant democratic reforms to the former British colony.

Police said they used 87 rounds of tear gas Sunday in what they called a necessary but restrained response to protesters pushing through cordons and barricades. They said 41 people were injured, including 12 police officers.

"Police cordon lines were heavily charged, by some violent protesters. So police had to use the minimum force in order to separate the distance at that moment between the protesters and also the police," said Cheung Tak-keung, the assistant police commissioner for operations.

The atmosphere was more festive Monday as constantly shifting crowds blocked major roads. People moved in and out of the sit-ins, some bringing in food and drink while others fetched their own. Some high school students, still in their school uniforms, sat on the pavement doing their homework.

"It's already the fourth day, so it's really tiring," said Ching-ching Tse, a 24-year-old student at the Chinese University of Hong Kong who was on her second day of collecting trash in the protest area with her friends. "So we are forming some groups and hope we can do some shifts and take turns."

Officials announced that schools in some districts of Hong Kong would remain closed Tuesday because of safety concerns, while dozens of bus routes were canceled and some subway stops near protest areas were closed.

The protests have been dubbed the "Umbrella Revolution" by some, because the crowds have used umbrellas to not only block the sun, but also to stop the police from hitting them with pepper spray. Political slogans calling for freedom have also been written on the umbrellas.

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CEO Indicted for Spyware App That Records Calls, Nearby Conversations

Sep 29, 2014 6:25pm

For the first time criminal charges have been brought against a suspect for allegedly advertising and selling spyware for the iPhone, Android and Blackberry – software that’s purportedly capable of intercepting phone calls, text messages and emails, and even eavesdropping on offline conversations happening within a few yards of the smartphone carrier.

The Department of Justice announced today the indictment of Pakistani national Hammad Akbar, CEO of InvoCode Pvt Ltd, the U.K.-based company that sells StealthGenie software online, in part marketing it to suspicious spouses and lovers. Akbar was arrested in Los Angeles Saturday.

“This application allegedly equips potential stalkers and criminals with a means to invade an individual’s confidential communications,” FBI Assistant Director in Charge Andrew McCabe said in a DOJ release. “They do this not by breaking into their homes or offices, but by physically installing spyware on unwitting victim’s phones and illegally tracking an individual’s every move. As technology continues to evolve, the FBI will investigate and bring to justice those who use illegal means to monitor and track individuals without their knowledge.”

The FBI says a potential user would need to be alone with a target device for “only a few minutes” to install the software and then could monitor the phone without physical contact again – using software that is “undetectable by most users and was advertised as being untraceable.”

In addition to monitoring basically all communications on the target smartphone, the StealthGenie user could “call the phone and activate it any time to monitor all surrounding conversations within a 15-foot radius,” the FBI said.

The DOJ release said that part of StealthGenie’s marketing plan was to sell to customers who suspect their significant others are cheating on them.

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White House Intruder Got Farther Than Previously Thought

The man who broke into the White House two weeks ago was able to make his way far into the property before being tackled in the East Room -- the room where President Obama and many other presidents have made some of their most important announcements, a law enforcement official confirmed today to ABC News.

The development calls into question the narrative originally released by the Secret Service, which had suggested that Omar Gonzalez, 42, of Texas, had been taken into custody near the front doors of the White House after jumping the fence and running more the 100 yards into the national landmark.

WATCH: White House Fence Jumper Arrested

White House Fence Jumper Omar Gonzalez Had 800 Rounds of Ammo in Car, Prosecutors Say

Obama 'Obviously Concerned' Over Security Breach

“Gonzalez failed to comply with responding Secret Service Uniformed Division Officers’ verbal commands, and was physically apprehended after entering the White House North Portico doors,” the Secret Service said in a statement on Sept. 20.

When he jumped over the fence outside of the White House, Gonzalez was allegedly carrying a folding pocket knife. After pushing through the front doors, he ran to the East Room, according to the official, confirming details first reported by The Washington Post.

A Secret Service spokesperson declined to comment, but the agency’s director, Julie Pierson, will be on the hot seat Tuesday as the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hold a hearing to examine several issues dogging the Secret Service.

In an interview with ABC News, the chairman of the committee, Darrell Issa, R-Calif., said Gonzalez got deep enough into the White House that had President Obama or Vice President Joe Biden been there “they could have been attacked.”

Signs of increased security around the White House were almost immediate after Gonzales made it into the complex, including additional barriers outside of the White House gates. In addition, the Secret Service beefed-up foot patrols along the fence line of the White House complex and deployed additional surveillance resources, a White House spokesman said at the time.

Gonzalez had been homeless in the nation’s capital for the past three months after 13 years in the U.S. Army, including a tour in Iraq.

Get real-time updates as this story unfolds. To start, just "star" this story in ABC News' phone app. Download ABC News for iPhone here or ABC News for Android here. To be notified about our live weekend digital reports, tap here.

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Hong Kong protests: In the thick of it – CNN International


The Hindu

Hong Kong protests: In the thick of it
CNN International
Tens of thousands of demonstrators are occupying Hong Kong's financial district in protest of what they see as Beijing's creeping influence on the way the semiautonomous region is run. CNN's correspondents have been on the ground reporting rising ...
Hong Kong Democracy Protesters Return in Swelling TideBloomberg
Hong Kong democracy protesters defy calls to disperseUSA TODAY
Armed with cell phones, Hong Kong's young protesters 'increasingly not scared'CNN
Telegraph.co.uk -New York Times -New York Daily News
all 4,348 news articles »
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